Go Green for a Red-Hot Holiday Season

Celebrate the Holidays in Style: Expert Rebecca Cole Says Go Green for a Red-Hot Holiday Season

The winter holiday season is the No. 1 floral-buying time of year. With that in mind, the Society of American Florists (SAF) has teamed with the host of Discovery Channel’s Surprise by Design Rebecca Cole to showcase the floral trends that will give homes a festive feeling this holiday season.

“Because we’re returning to our roots and hosting intimate celebrations at home, we’ll see more traditional colors, and greenery, whose scents will bring us back to our childhood,” said Cole, who also is a contributor to the Today show.

The Traditional Meaning of Greenery

Great holiday arrangements begin with greenery. In ancient cultures, people believed that bringing foliage into the home during the season was lucky and guaranteed the return of vegetation in the spring. Even today, green remains a staple in holiday décor.

Dreaming of ChristmasRebecca’s Tips for Sprucing Up Your Home:

  • Incorporate a scented pine or other greens into a centerpiece or table arrangement. Accent the greens with flowers that complement the home’s décor.
  • Ask your florist for a bunch of evergreen, cypress or mistletoe to place throughout your home – over the threshold, in the foyer or on the mantel.
  • Line a mantel or dining table with small evergreen topiaries or “baby” Christmas trees decorated with bows or flowers.
  • Florists carry a wide selection of poinsettias in pink, peach, white, plum and speckled or marbled varieties, in addition to the traditional red.

According to Cole, “Whether it’s a gift or for home décor, ‘colorful greenery’ is a thoughtful and long-lasting way to send holiday cheer.”

It is well known that people remember receiving flowers. According to a recent study by SAF and The Michael Cohen Group, 92 percent of women remember the last time they received flowers. Because they are a time when memories are made, there is no better time than the holidays for sending a sentiment of caring.

“Sending flowers for the holidays is the gift of emotion,” Cole said. “The season has a way of conjuring up feelings of nostalgia. We think about grandma’s house, the cozy fireplace, the great feast and good times with family and friends. Flowers and plants are the finishing touch that make the holidays complete.”

From wreaths to centerpieces, bulb plants and topiaries, Cole shares her best bets for holiday winners.

  • Amaryllis and Paper White Narcissus are examples of bulb plants that if given after Thanksgiving or in early December, will bloom just in time for Christmas. Cyclamen, kalanchoe and Christmas cactus are other great flowering plant options.
  • Ask your florist to design an arrangement incorporating fruits and vegetables to create a winter harvest feeling.
  • Candles added to a centerpiece create a sense of warmth and glow to the holiday table. Shiny decorative balls incorporated into a centerpiece will reflect the light for an even more festive feel.

Gift of Roses  | TFWEB263Holiday Soirees

According to Cole, this year’s designs will be all about simple elegance with a flair for fun. “If you don’t have a white Christmas on the outside, bring it inside, with big bunches of anemones or other white flowers,” Cole said.

Cole has this advice for creating festive, colorful tables for dinner, brunch or even cocktail hour.

  • Florists are now creating beautiful flower arrangements using colorful poinsettias and amaryllis – now available as cut flowers – for a stylish centerpiece.
  • Decorate a brunch table with splashes of morning hues, including oranges, yellows and reds in decorative containers, or even champagne flutes.
  • Fill a round Christmas ornament or other small holiday container with small bunches of flowers to use as place card holders for guests.
  • A palette of white and silver adds elegance to a holiday table and is expected to be a popular color scheme for the upcoming holiday season.
  • Arrangements and centerpieces in robust hues of purple and burgundy will create a sensuous, lush setting for dinners, both intimate and large.
  • If you are attending a holiday gathering, ask your florist to deliver a cheerful arrangement or holiday plant before you arrive. When you show up, you’ll be the talk of the evening.

About Rebecca Cole

Rebecca Cole is a New York City floral and interior designer. She is the founder of Cole Creates, a retail and design business, and she appears regularly on television and radio shows. The author of Flower Power, Potted Gardens and Paradise Found, she is a regular contributor to the Today show and has appeared on Oprah. Cole is also the star of the Discovery Channel show, Surprise by Design.

©SAF All Rights Reserved

Top 5 Reasons to Send Flowers for the Holidays

24 Karat Bouquet | 08N940B
24 Karat Bouquet | 08N940B

Thirteen shopping days until Christmas.  You know what video games, consoles, cell phones and media players are on your kids’ wish list.  You have a great gift in mind for the spouse.  But you don’t have a clue what to send your loved ones scattered around the country.    Flowers!  Gift Baskets!  Poinsettias!  Perfect.  Easy.  And here’s why:

  1. Shopping for flowers is easy.  Shop online any time of day.  Have your addresses and credit card handy.  Choose from our Holiday selections, add to the shopping cart, enter three minutes’ worth of information, another two minutes of info for each recipient, hit “Submit” and you’re golden.  Or call us at 888.255.9500, 24/7 to place your order with a floral consultant.
  2. Shopping for flowers is time-saving.  See #1.
  3. Shopping for flowers is affordable.  Factor in what your time is worth, how long it would take at the local mall, shopping center or departments store, gift wrapping, packaging, and standing in line to mail everything, and the real cost of sending flowers plummets.
  4. Flowers are the perfect gift.  They provide holiday cheer & atmosphere.  And gourmet and fruit baskets are a delightful gift for the whole family to enjoy.
  5. You get to save $10 for EACH arrangement you order.  (Offer good until December 15, 2008. Use promotion code Pine2.  Applies to online orders only.)

Tips for Shopping Online for Holiday Flowers

You may be surprised to learn that Christmas and Hanukkah are the top holiday times for flowers in number of sales and dollar volume — capturing 30 percent of each — according to The Society of American Florists, or SAF.  Mother’s Day is second, with 24 percent of the transactions and 25 percent of the dollar volume, while Valentine’s Day comes in third. The figures are based on sales of cut flowers and potted plants at all types of retail outlets.

Florists fall into two categories: physical and online. Karen Marinelli, a Pennsylvania-based floral industry professional who consults with retail and wholesale florists, advocates florists because, unlike big-box stores or supermarkets, they have an incentive to care for the plants. “The florist paid for them the minute they got them,” says Marinelli.  And because neither grocery stores nor big-box stores are set up to care for flowers in terms of refrigeration and a watering regimen, quality deteriorates fast.

“Temperature is really important for cut flowers. A difference of five degrees makes a huge difference in vase life,” says Marinelli. Flowers consistently kept cold from the time they are picked through transportation and retail display should last 10 days in the home, she says. But if you’re looking at a display of bouquets poking out of buckets containing room-temperature water that may be dirty or slimy, forget it. Puddles on the floor by the display are another red flag. Bacteria and mold will flourish in the stagnant water and your flowers will suffer for it.

“Supermarkets are going to give you the best price,” says Paul Goodman, an Oklahoma-based consultant who runs Floral Finance Business Services. “If you want to have design services and you want to have delivery, that’s the retail florist’s market.” Goodman likes florists for their service, but that means higher prices.

“The retail florist is in the special occasion business,” he says. “It’s not going to be the cheapest, by any stretch of the imagination.”

Using a Local Florist Saves You Money

Buying online can be risky. If you want flowers delivered to long-distance loved ones, it’s best to order directly from a florist in their city.  Searching online can often lead you to what the industry calls “order gatherers” or “fake florists” who will charge a hefty $10 to $15 fee. 

The other option for delivery is transmitting the order to a florist in the recipient’s city via a local florist. You will have to pay a $5 to $7 wire-service fee, but that’s still about half of a typical online fee.

Using a local florist also gives you an advocate, Marinelli says.  “Using the Internet to relay an order is expensive,” Marinelli says. “Some of the online sites really take advantage of consumers.”

“With a local florist, you have a place to go back to if there’s a problem. There is accountability built in,” she says. In addition, online sites often tout arrangements, also known as expressions, that feature costly out-of season flowers and containers, says Marinelli. A florist can guide a buyer not only to what is in-season but what’s actually in  their cooler, eliminating the time and cost to source what an order gatherer sold.

“In my estimation, a good professional florist can convey the same expression in flowers for at least $25 less than it would cost to send the expression by an online order gatherer,” Marinelli says.

Exerpts from:  Flowers: The perfect gift at any price
By Cari Noga • Bankrate.com  • Cari is a freelance writer in Michigan.

Christmas Poinsettias – Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow

Red Poinsettia - TF103-1
Red Poinsettia - TF103-1

Yesterday – The History and Legend of the Poinsettia

Joel Robert Poinsett, who was an amateur botanist and the first ambassador to Mexico, first introduced poinsettias to the United States in 1825 when he brought some cuttings to his plantation in Greenwood, South Carolina.  When Poinsett died in 1851, December 12 was declared Nationnal Poinsettia Day, an official day set aside to enjoy this symbol of holiday cheer.

Poinsettias are native to Mexico, where they grow wild. The enchanting legend of the poinsettia dates back several centuries, to a Christmas Eve in Mexico when a little girl named Pepita had no gift to present to the Christ child.

Her cousin Pedro urged her to give a humble gift. So, on her way to church she gathered some weeds she found along the road. As she approached the altar, a miracle happened: The weeds blossomed into brilliant flowers. Then they were called Flores de Noche Buena – Flowers of the Holy Night. Now they are called poinsettias.

Today – Enjoying Your Poinsettia During the Christmas Holiday

Poinsettias are a versatile decorative staple, perfect for use at home on the table or in front of the hearth.  At work, poinsettias make beautiful stand-alone decorative accents in long hallways, simply placed on a desk, or filling the foyer with bright red and green.   And they are perfect to send home with employees just before the Christmas holiday.

Poinsettias complement almost any holiday decor because of their classic vibrant red and green colors.  They can be placed on the floor, on accent tables or on the dining room sidebar.  Any interior space that needs just a touch more holiday can be celebrated with a poinsettia or two.   Because they are so traditional, we immediately think of the holidays when we see them.  And more than 50 million poinsettias are expected to be sold this holiday season!

Choosing Your Poinsettia: (Or let your florist choose a healthy poinsettia for you!)

  • Inspect the bracts. Bracts are modified leaves and are the colored portion of the poinsettia plant. Bracts should have good color, a mature shape and not have a great deal of green along the edges.
  • Examine the leaves. Rich, dark green foliage is a sign of health in poinsettia plants. Make sure the leaves are plentiful and are growing down the length of the stem.
  • Note the size of the pot. The poinsettia should be growing in a container appropriate for the plant. The accepted guideline is that the poinsettia should be approximately 2 1/2 times the diameter of the pot.
  • Check the soil. Stick your finger in the soil and test the moisture. Avoid plants with soggy soil and appear to be wilting. This could be a sign of over watering and possibly root rot. Poinsettia soil should be moist and only allowed to become dry to a depth of 1/2 inch.
  • Observe how the poinsettias are being displayed. Be cautious of poinsettia that are displayed in plastic sleeves or crowded together. They need space and crowding can cause the plant to loose bracts.
  • Evaluate the poinsettia’s general appearance. The poinsettia should appear full from all angles, without bare spots. The stems should be erect and leaves and bracts do not appear wilted. If leaves or bracts fall from the poinsettia when you pick it up, choose another plant.

Keeping Your Family and Pets Safe – The Poinsettia Toxicity Myth

The poinsettia is widely tested as a consumer plant, proving the myth about the popular holiday plant to be false:

  • Scientific research from The Ohio State University has proved the poinsettia to be non-toxic to both humans and pets.  All parts of the plant were tested, including the leaves and sap.
  • According to POISINDEX, the national information center for poison control centers, a child would have to ingest 500-600 leaves in order to exceed the experimental doses that found no toxicity.
  • A study from the Children’s Hospital in Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University found that out of 22,793 reported poinsettia exposures there was essentially no toxicity significance of any kind. The study used national data collected by the American Association of Poison Control Centers.
  • As with any non-food product, however, the poinsettia is not meant to be eaten and can cause varying degrees of discomfort; therefore, the plant should be kept out of the reach of young children and curious pets.
     

Tomorrow – Poinsettia Care Tips

Poinsettias are long-lasting blooming plants. To keep your poinsettia blooming all year long, follow the care tips listed below:

To keep the poinsettia blooming:

  • When surface soil is dry to the touch, water thoroughly. Discard excess water in the saucer.
  • To prolong color, keep a temperature range of 60 degrees for night and 72 degrees for day.
  • High humidity is preferable.
  • Place plant away from hot or cold drafts, and protect from cold winds.

 To rebloom for the next season:

  • During winter, continue to follow holiday upkeep tips.
  • March 1 (St. Patrick’s Day): When bracts fade, cut stems back to eight inches above soil line.
  • Continue to water regularly.
  • Lightly fertilize with a balanced all-purpose plant food every three to four weeks.
  • When temperatures are warm, place plant outdoors; first in indirect, then direct sunlight.
  • Avoid temperatures below 50 degrees throughout the summer.
  •  July 4 (Independence Day): Cut back new growth stems. Repot if needed.
  • Early September (Labor Day): Move plant inside. Provide six ormore hours of direct light.
  • October 1 through December: Confine plant to complete darkness for 14 hours, giving it 10 hours of natural light daily. This will set the buds and cause bracts to color.

MyFlorist is a proud provider of poinsettias and holiday flowers in the Washington DC Metro.   Deck the halls, decorators!

Dress the Turkey. Dress the Table.

Golden Harvest | TFWEB219
Golden Harvest | TFWEB219

The Thanksgiving Table

While food, family, and football are possibly the three most celebrated traditions of an American Thanksgiving, we’d like to discuss the rich traditions of setting the tone of Thanksgiving with the dinner table itself.

Setting the Thanksgiving Table

If you are serving a more formal Thanksgiving dinner in the dining room, and have the opportunity to put out a full course of dishes, silver, and linen, we offer a reminder to those who normally enjoy a less formal dining experience!
 
Begin to set your table by placing a freshly ironed white tablecloth, a runner, or placemats. If you wish to use service or charger plates (extra large plates used mostly for decoration and catching spills) place those first around the table, equally spaced. On top of those place the dinner plates, and if you are having a soup course, place the soup dish on top of that.

The general rule for silverware is you put the ones you will use first on the outside of each setting, and you work your way in. To the right of each plate, first place the dinner knife with the blade facing the plate. On its right, place the teaspoon, and further to the right place the soupspoon. Optionally a dessert spoon may be placed horizontally above the plate, pointing to the left.

On the left, place the dessert fork nearest the plate (if there is to be one), then the dinner fork and finally, the salad fork to the left of that. The bottoms of each piece of silverware should line up with the bottom of the dinner plate.

The bread and butter plate is placed directly above the forks, with a butter spreader placed horizontally across the top of the plate, with the tip pointing to the left.

Above the plate and slightly to the right you place the water glass, with a red wine glass to the right of that and a white wine glass to the right of all.

Napkins traditionally are folded and placed to the left of the forks, but alternately you may wish to fold it and place it in the soup bowl or the water glass.

Once the table is set, you’ll need to add a centerpiece or two, depending on the length of the table.

Decorating the Thanksgiving Table

Accessorize a large table by placing a long, narrow centerpiece in the center. Add a few smaller accent pieces or candles on each side of the arrangement for an added effect.

Ask your florist to create a centerpiece in a treasured family vase or bowl, or in seasonal pieces such as a cornucopia or a utility vase surrounded by dry corncobs. You may want to garnish your serving trays with flowers and greens. Scatter colorful fall leaves, flowers and votive candles along the center of your dining table.

You may also want to ask your florist to design the arrangements for your buffet table on several different levels to keep the eye flowing all along the table.

Finally, you may want to place a garland or wreath of fruit, flowers and fall foliage over your front door. 

Check out the elegant Thanksgiving Floral Designs at MyFlorist! 

And we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving!

5 Steps to a Romantic Night at Home that She Won’t Forget

Romantic Rose
Romantic Rose

Here are some tried and true steps for a classic romatic evening at home.  The key is to set a relaxing mood and pamper her extravagently.

 
Step 1:  Gather supplies. 
2 – 3 days ahead of time.
 
Here are some supplies you may need to line up beforehand – keep in mind what she likes and make changes to our advice accordingly.  If you are surprising her, hide everything! 
  • Tapered Candles – at least 2, with holders.   You can find these at a candle shop or a department store.
  • Wine – You can find good wine starting at $10 a bottle.  Ask your liquor store clerk for help. 
  • Flowers – Order a quality flower arrangement and have it delivered just before she arrives home.  If you are not surprising her, you might want to have them delivered to her workplace.  If you are ordering roses, buy one, two or three dozen.  Call your florist and make arrangements now.  Consider ordering an elegant centerpiece for the dinner table as well.
  • Mood music.  Set up a CD or Ipod speaker system to play her favorite relaxing music.   Burn her favorite mix, if you have the chance.
  • Bubble bath and votive candles.  These can be found at a department store at the mall or possibly your neighborhood drug store.
  • You’ll need to either cook her favorite meal or order it for pickup.  Plan this ahead of time so you aren’t stressed.

Step 2 – Set the Stage
2 Hours – 4 Hours Ahead of Time

  • Clean the house.  At least the areas visible to her during the evening.
  • Set the table with your best china, cutlery, napkins & stemware.
  • If you chose a white wine, put it in the fridge to chill at least three hours ahead of time.
  • Put the tall candles in the center of the table.  Don’t light them until just before she arrives.
  • Pick up dinner or begin cooking.  Coordinate your cooking  times with your personal grooming time and/or hers.  If you are picking up, do it before she arrives.
  • Shave, shower and shampoo.  Brush your teeth.  Splash on a little cologne.  Put on clean, dress-casual clothes.
  • Set up the bathroom.  This is optional.  She may enjoy a long bubble bath surrounded by candles while you finish preparing the food.  It is okay to ask her if she wants a half hour or hour to herself before dinner.  She may enjoy relaxing and making herself look good for you, too!

Step 3 – Meet Her at the Door
Just as the night begins.

Give her a kiss and present her flowers with a smile.   Show her the table, let her know the menu, and offer her a glass of wine and a bubble bath.   Time the meal preparation accordingly. 

Step 4 – Wine and Dine
Relax and enjoy the ambiance!

Turn on the music.  Light the candles.  Top off the wine glasses. Eat, drink and enjoy yourselves.

Step 5 – Be Charming and Considerate
All night long.

Enjoy the evening.  You both deserve it!  Just remember to clean the kitchen for her the next day and bask in the loving looks she sends your way.

 

Eckhart Tolle – Flowers Enlighten Us

Sunny Smiles
Sunny Smiles

When you open the book “A New Earth” by Eckhart Tolle, the first paragraphs are about the beauty of flowers and how they impact us:

 

Earth, 114 million years ago, one morning just after sunrise: The first flower ever to appear on the planet opens up to receive the rays of the sun.

 

Prior to this momentous event that heralds an evolutionary transformation in the life of plants, the planet had already been covered in vegetation for millions of years. The first flower probably did not survive for long, and flowers must have remained rare and isolated phenomena, since conditions were most likely not yet favourable for a widespread flowering to occur. One day, however, a critical threshold was reached, and suddenly there would have been an explosion of colour and scent all over the planet – if a perceiving consciousness had been there to witness it.

 

An awakening power

Much later, those delicate and fragrant beings we call flowers would come to play an essential part in the evolution of consciousness of another species. Humans would increasingly be drawn to and fascinated by them. As the consciousness of human beings developed, flowers were most likely the first thing they came to value which had no utilitarian purpose for them, that is to say, was not linked in some way to survival. They provided inspiration to countless artists, poets, and mystics. Jesus tells us to contemplate the flowers and learn from them how to live. The Buddha is said to have given a ‘silent sermon’ once during which he held up a flower and gazed at it. After a while, one of those present, a monk called Mahakasyapa, began to smile. He is said to have been the only one who had understood the sermon. According to legend, that smile (that is to say, realization) was handed down by twenty-eight successive masters and much later became the origin of Zen.

 

Seeing beauty in a flower could awaken humans, however briefly, to the beauty that is an essential part of their own innermost being, their true nature. The first recognition of beauty was one of the most significant events in the evolution of human consciousness. The feelings of joy and love are intrinsically connected to that recognition. Without fully realizing it, flowers would become for us an expression in form of that which is most high, most sacred, and ultimately formless within ourselves. Flowers, more fleeting, more ethereal, and more delicate than the plants out of which they emerged, would become like messengers from another realm, like a bridge between the world of physical forms and the formless. They not only had a scent that was delicate and pleasing to humans, but also brought a fragrance from the realm of spirit. Using the word ‘enlightenment’ in a wider sense than the conventionally accepted one, we could look upon flowers as the enlightenment of plants.

 

Get Eckhart’s book here.

Get flowers here.

McCain, Obama & Anniversary Flowers

We know Barack chose white roses with babies’ breath for his and Michelle’s 16th wedding anniversay.   It was reported by the Chicago Sun!   And while we didn’t catch the scoop on the type of flowers John might have chosen for his and Cindy’s 28th anniversary, we dare to presume he may have sent her orchids…    

If you are looking for ideas for your own upcoming anniversary, here are some great suggestions:

Her Favorite Flowers – This is a great choice, but talk with your florist to make sure they are in season.  Not all flowers are stocked year-round.

Flowers in Her Favorite Color – Your florist can create a beautiful arrangement in shades of almost any color.

Roses –  Roses are anniversary favorites world-wide because they symbolize romantic love, celebration and high value.

Holland Arrangement – The best quality flowers come from Holland.  These are usually the preferred flowers for weddings, anniversaries and special events because of their color, texture and superior quality.

Exotic Flowers – For a bolder, more distinctive floral gift, you might consider a tropical design. 

MyFlorist has a unique selection of breathtaking anniversary arrangements.  Keep us in mind for your next anniversary! 

MyFlorist.  Your Expression.  Our Passion.

MyFlorist Exclusive – 2009 Dish Gardens Are In!

Copper Garden
Copper Garden

Dish gardens are wonderful gifts during the late fall and winter months.   They are attractive, easy to care for and full of life. 

Our enhanced collection for 2009 includes brand new designs that include foliage, foliage with fresh cuts, and European gardens.  Check out our selection here.

Generally, a dish garden will be planted in a leak-proof container or lined with plastic so they can be put on finished wood surfaces.  Containers can be ceramic, metal, terra-cotta, wicker or metal.  

Best of all, almost any occasion or decor can be celebrated with a dish garden.  When choosing a dish garden as a gift, keep in mind the decor of the recipient.  If the home is more traditional, a ceramic container with a porcelain look may look better than a garden in a wicker basket or terra-cotta pot.  For an office, a non-blooming selection of plants may be easier to care for and hold up well during vacations and weekends.

Also, keep in mind that added fresh cut flowers will last up to a week.  And the hardier green plants should flourish with proper care and give the recipient months, if not years, of enjoyment.

Flowers & The Economy

Classic
Classic

As the US government pushes the record-making $700 billion bail-out for the banking sector, and a $25 billion loan to carmakers, our confidence as consumers takes a tumble. We, as a nation, are cutting back, learning to live on a cash basis. Fuel and food prices are going up and we hear “economic depression” on the news and around the water cooler. So in this economy, who can afford luxuries like flowers? If we put aside certain events like weddings and funerals and Mother’s Day where flowers are often necessary to express our feelings, what else warrants such decadent spending? Let’s do a Top 10 list of Why Flowers Are Always Affordable:

  1. Flowers bring us back to Mother Earth. They are alive. Touch them and you can’t help but feel more connected to the universe.
  2. Flowers are easy to order online and have sent almost anywhere in the world, usually within half a business day. So they are great for last minute gifts or far away loved ones.
  3. Flowers never go out of style. They can express a gracious business thank you or a fun nudge to say, “Hey, I’m still thinking of you.”
  4. Flowers soothe us. The aroma, the delicate beauty and the gentle spirit of flowers give us those “Stop and Smell the Flowers” moments away from the financial and technical stress in our everyday lives.
  5. Flowers give us a lot of bang for our luxury buck. For the same price as a dozen beautiful roses you could fill up your gas tank, buy a pair of slacks, or pay your cell phone bill. But you wouldn’t get the “Ooh’s and Ahh’s”.
  6. Flowers dress up a room and make us feel loved. Those of
    us who have been unfortunate enough to stay in the hospital
    for more than a couple of nights without getting flowers know it’s just not
    right.
  7. Flowers encourage and cheer us on. You can congratulate someone with a card or you can show them how proud you are – expressing even deeper levels of feeling – even more with flowers.
  8. Flowers are romantic. Red roses are still a requirement
    for any important evening that involves romance.
    Having roses delivered to her office or home before you pick her up can set
    the right tone for the night.
  9. Flowers give us bragging rights at the office. Not that we’d actually brag. It’s a given that someone thinks us awesome.
  10. Flowers are a luxury. Having a fresh floral arrangement in any room of your house is like sleeping on Egyptian cotton, wearing silk or sipping a fine wine. They are sensuous and beautiful like a summer breeze through the trees with sunlight on our faces and freshly cut grass between our toes.

Balance your checkbook. Pay your bills. Check your investments. And then send
some flowers
.